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Maps and More: Creating a Historical GIS from the Ground Up, Mar 13

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
Cal researcher Daniel Viragh and the undergraduate students working with him through the URAP program will present about their historical GIS research project. Their work pulls together a scanned map from the library collection and late 1800s era directories of Budapest to create a tool for investigating historical social patterns in the city.

Animal and Ancestral Passions and Wisdom, Mar 17

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
Bestselling author and science writer Virginia Morell speaks about ANIMAL WISE, her newest book. In it she explores the once-forbidden land of animal minds with scientists courageous enough to tackle the questions: What and how do animals think? In her book, you'll read about her trips to meet researchers who've discovered that ants teach, parrots converse, rats laugh, and cheetahs can die from heartbreak. Morell also discusses her related work on the history of human origins research of Louis Leakey.

Making Mission Communities, Mar 18

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
Recent ethnohistorical research on the Spanish mission communities of La Florida has done much to document complicated patterns of indigenous population relocations. These migrations, aggregations, and dispersals—due to multiple factors such as epidemics, Spanish reducción policies, and flight from antagonistic native groups—resulted in the formation of complex and diverse colonial social networks. In this presentation I explore this process at Mission Santa Catalina de Guale (GA), a 17th century Spanish Mission located on St. Catherines Island, Georgia, considering the role of both ceramic production and the circulation of glass beads in the formation of an aggregated, pluralistic, colonial community.

I did not want to make pots. I wanted to go to school, Apr 1

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
Meet Medhin Gebreselasie. Medhin was born and raised in Bieta Giyorgis, a small village in Northern Tigray, in the heart of the Ethiopian highlands. She wanted to go to school. Instead she got married at an early age and became a potter, like her mother and her grandmother before her. Pottery making here is not rewarding, and not even sustainable. But it is Medhin’s only skill.
Medhin’s story is similar to many other stories I heard during my ethnoarchaeological research in Tigray. For me, she became both a symbol of the unfortunate condition of many women in Tigray and a beacon that guided my own journey into the culture and history of this region. As an archaeologist in Ethiopia, I wondered in which way these lands and the deep layers of their history, had contributed to, if not determined entirely, Medhin’s destiny. The powerful empire of Aksum disintegrated in Tigray between 800-900 AD. With it, went dense urban and suburban networks, palaces, the demand for highly specialized skills, and the very glue that had maintained these lands within a powerful political and social framework. What happened to the people then? Archaeological surveys and excavations in the region tell us that soon after Aksum collapsed, the settlement pattern became what it is today, small rural communities clustered around the few remaining natural resources. Together with settlement patterns, many other aspects of modern life in this region have direct connections with the archaeological past: farming techniques, architecture, technological skills, ethnicity, and religion. This talk will intertwine personal experiences with the larger archaeological history of this region. I will demonstrate that much of the modern Tigrean culture is rooted into its ancient past and traditions, and that Medhin’s and the other potters’ condition might be one of the consequences of this long historical and cultural process. Given these deep roots, is life for Medhin and her daughters destined to remain the same? Is this the end of the story? I think not…

2015 Faculty Research Lectures-Montgomery Slatkin, Apr 1

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
102nd Annual Martin Meyerson Faculty Research Lectures

Montgomery Slatkin, Professor of Integrative Biology, presenting "Population Genetics of the Neanderthal Genome Project" on April 1, 2015.

Jennifer Doudna, Professor of Chemistry, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, and Li Ka Shing Chancellor's Professor in Biomedical & Health Sciences, presenting "The Biology of CRISPRs: From Genome Defense to Genomic Engineering" on April 8, 2015.

Anuradhapura (Sri Lanka), the City of the Buddhist Sangha?, Apr 14

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
Talk by archaeologist and art historian, Osmund Bopearachchi, Director of Research, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), Paris, and currently the Numata Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies at UC Berkeley.

Speaker Bio
Osmund Bopearachchi is a Director of Research at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in its Hellenism and Oriental Civilisations program (UMR 8546/5), and teaches Central Asian and South-Asian archaeology and art history at the Paris IV–Sorbonne University. Professor Bopearachchi holds a BA from the University of Kelaniya (Sri Lanka), a BA honors, (MA), M.Phil., Ph.D from the Paris I-Sorbonne University, and a Higher Doctorate (Habilitation) from the Paris IV-Sorbonne University. He has published nine books, edited six others, and published 130 articles in international journals. Currently the Trung Lam Visiting Scholar in Central Asian Art and Archaeology (2010–2012) at the University of California, Berkeley, Professor Bopearachchi is working on a new catalogue of Graeco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek Coins, as well as the publication of a selection of hitherto unknown masterpieces from Gandhāra and Greater Gandhāra dispersed in museums and private collections in Japan, Europe, Canada, and the United States of America.

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AGITATING IMAGES: Photography Against History in Indigenous Siberia, Mar 13

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
This talk will explore the central themes in Agitating Images: Photography Against History in Indigenous Siberia. This book is a composite project that ranges between cultural history, visual anthropology, and continental philosophy. The first component draws together critiques of photography, archives, and historical knowledge. The notion of ‘agitation’ is a conceptual intervention I develop to argue that the photographic image is an inherently unstable historical signifier whose very instability should be amplified and foregrounded. The second component sets these critiques against the earliest stages of socialist development and construction among Siberian Indigenous peoples in the early post-revolutionary period. My work weaves together historical and cultural critique with theoretical interventions grounded in a commitment to ordinary aesthetics and everyday life.

Brown Bag Lecture, Apr 8

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
This is a brown bag lecture.

The 4th Mario A. Del Chiaro Lecture, Apr 16

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
For many centuries the Tuscan landscape has provided the setting for hilltop cities and towns, undulating hills covered with olive trees or vineyards, and rivers and roads that provide avenues for trade and travels between the coast and the inland. The landscape was important to the Etruscans, but for reasons that may escape us unless we are willing to see what we look at and to develop a sensitivity for the importance of sacred places throughout ancient Etruria. Thanks to literary sources and abundant archaeological evidence it is possible, although not always easy, to recreate the religious landscape created by the Etruscans, with sacred mountains and caves, springs and lakes, combined with elaborate urban and extra—urban sanctuaries with temples and altars.

In my lecture I will present examples of known and lesser known sacred spaces of ancient Etruria and hope to show how the landscape contributed to the Etruscan perception of the world and the worship of deities that determined the wellbeing of individuals as well as communities with a sense of religious piety that the neighbors of the Etruscans, including the Romans, seem to have found both puzzling and enviable.

Brown Bag Lecture, Apr 22

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
This is a brown bag lecture.

Brown Bag Lecture, Apr 29

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
This is a brown bag lecture.

Brown Bag Lecture, May 6

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
This is a brown bag lecture.

Spatial Data Science for Professionals, May 20-22

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
International and Executive Programs (IEP) and the Geospatial Innovation Facility (GIF) at the College of Natural Resources are hosting a 3-day intensive bootcamp on Spatial Data Science on May 20-22, 2015.

The goal of this Spatial Data Science Bootcamp is to familiarize participants with the modern spatial data workflow and explore open source and cloud/web based options for spatial data management, analysis, visualization and publication. We’ll use hands-on exercises that leverage open source and cloud/web based technologies for a variety of spatial data applications.

The Melpomene Chair Greek Studies Conference, Dec 7

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
A conference of invited papers on the language, literature, culture, and reception of Ancient Greece.
The conference marks the retirement in December 2015 of Donald Mastronarde, Melpomene Distinguished Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures, and the speakers are Berkeley PhD's and Scuola Normale (Pisa) PhD's from past decades and recent years.

The Melpomene Chair Greek Studies Conference, Dec 8

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 03/13/2015 - 08:44
A conference of invited papers on the language, literature, culture, and reception of Ancient Greece.
The conference marks the retirement in December 2015 of Donald Mastronarde, Melpomene Distinguished Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures, and the speakers are Berkeley PhD's and Scuola Normale (Pisa) PhD's from past decades and recent years.
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