Other Archaeology Events at Cal

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Updated: 9 hours 35 min ago

Revisiting the Grave: Post-funeral Performances in Late Bronze Age Aegean Tombs, Apr 14

9 hours 35 min ago
Mortuary data forms one of the primary sources for studying the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean. It is often, however, examined in isolation from the complex, multi-staged processes and performances that made up the funeral and everything that followed it, given that the most popular tomb types, the tholos and chamber tombs, were used for multiple burials. The depositional sequence of these actions is most frequently overlooked, not least because of practical difficulties in identifying and reconstructing these events and the ephemeral and often ambiguous nature of the evidence. Despite these limitations, however, there are many clues, both direct – in the form of residual remains – and indirect – in the form of purposefully destroyed things – that hint at a whole range of funerary and post-funerary actions, involving the bodies and bones of those previously interred as well as the objects placed with them in the graves.

This lecture revisits the methodologies used in the identification of these actions and the interpretations that have been put forward to explain the post-funeral manipulation of bones and objects in Late Bronze Age tombs. ‘Essential’ as these actions may have been, because of the reuse of the tombs, scholarship may have actually conflated different sets of information to produce a rather homogeneous picture that is still extensively used in the reconstruction of ‘Mycenaean burial customs’. These post-funeral actions, however, may have actually entailed a number of different performances, which formed part of multi-staged episodes and of a more complex and nuanced web of social practice than previously thought.

How can we identify and reconstruct post-funeral manipulation? What did these processes and performances entail? What can we learn about the Aegean Late Bronze Age societies from the examination of their post-funeral practices? These questions are pertinent to current discussions in Mediterranean archaeology regarding the extent and significance of funeral manipulation of bones and objects and of intentional acts of fragmentation in the archaeological record.

Digital Humanities at Berkeley Launch Event (RSVP by Feb. 13), Feb 18

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
You are cordially invited to a launch event for Digital Humanities at Berkeley. This event will also celebrate the opening of The Future of Memory: Jewish Culture in the Digital Age at the Magnes Collection.The project includes an installation, exhibition, and digital research lab in which museum professionals, scholars, students, and the public, discuss the meaning of memory and the many facets of digital history. Please RSVP by Feb. 13.

Landscape Dynamics at Acconia, Italy, Feb 19

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
Dr. Albert Ammerman will discuss his research surrounding land-use at Acconia in Southern Italy and the implications for the development of method and theory in survey archaeology.

POMPEII Smart City and Territory, Feb 25

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
Presentation of the ‘POMPEII Smart City and Territory’ project, which includes the most important archeological site in the world, Unesco property since 1997, and the entire municipality’s territory, through an Atlantis described with a careful multi-disciplinal and multi-scalar analysis of the material and immaterial cultural heritage.



personal bio: Carmine GAMBARDELLA. Full Professor. Director of the Department of Architecture and Industrial Design “Luigi Vanvitelli” at Second University of Naples (SUN). President and project leader of the Centre of Excellence of the Campania Region on Cultural Heritage, Ecology and Economy (BENECON), Institutional member of Forum UNESCO University and Heritage. This is a consortium of four Universities (SUN, University of Naples, University of Salerno, University of Sannio). Scientific responsible of national and international projects on smart cities and territories.

Something New and Rare, Feb 26

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
The Stoddard Lecturer for 2014-15 is Professor Thomas B.F. Cummins, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian and Colonial Art at Harvard University.

Life, Labor, and Maintenance of Indigenous Home Places in 19th Century Central California, Feb 18

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
In this talk, I will present an update on my current dissertation research at Tolay Lake Regional Park located in southern Sonoma County, California. This dissertation is a community-engaged research project that was designed in close collaboration with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria (FIGR), the tribe whose traditional territory is Marin and southern Sonoma Counties. To date, my research teams have completed two field seasons (2013 and 2014). Our goals for this research are: 1. to better understand the environmental history of the Tolay Valley; 2. to better understand the extent to which this valley was actively managed by Indigenous people; 3. to gain insight into the lives of Indigenous people during and after the establishment of Spanish Missions, Mexican ranchos, and the Californian state. I will pay special attention in this presentation to what the archaeological sites at Tolay can tell us about the experiences of Indigenous people working on ranches and making their homes on the traditional middens or mounds just beyond the immediate oversight of their employers.

Crossing Paths, Feb 18

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
Carolyn Smith:
"When you get to feel part of a place, you just never get
separated from it...": Basket Weaving in Northwestern
California during the 1980s.”
Carolyn Smith (Karuk) is a PhD candidate in the Department of
Anthropology and the Karuk Tribe's People's Center Coordinator.
Her research addresses the question of how basketry has been and
continues to be a vital, living part of Karuk culture, integrated in
memory, history, ecological knowledge, and language. Her goal is to
contribute to the body of knowledge of Karuk basket weaving to
honor past, present, and future generations of weavers.

Briana Surmick:
“The rise of Diabetes in Urban Indian Communities:
Oakland, Ca”
Briana Surmick (Pomo/Diné) is a 3rd year Ethnic Studies major
at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research addresses
the questions of how Diabetes affects Native American peoples in
Urban communities, as well as who gets included in those
statistics. Her goal is to raise awareness of this disease affecting
Native peoples, as well as looking at the efforts that communities
are taking to fight back.

Ancient travelers’ inscriptions from Kharga Oasis, Egypt, Feb 19

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
In this paper I will discuss some recent results from North Kharga Oasis Survey team’s epigraphic work and the National Endowment for Humanities-funded project “Ancient travelers’ inscriptions from Kharga Oasis, Egypt”. I will concentrate on ancient rock graffiti and pictorial carvings from a number of rock sites in the sandy area north of Kharga Oasis. These lonely spots in the western desert were used in antiquity as camping sites and stopovers for ancient travelers using the routes that connected Kharga to Dakhlah Oasis, or even further westwards, to Libya. The studied epigraphic material provides us with valuable information about the uses of these desert routes, traveling practices, as well as the identity and background of the ancient travelers who chose to leave their marks on these rocks.

Perspectives on Native Representations, Feb 20

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
While the history between Native peoples and representations of identity projected upon them (having been replicated and reinforced in popular culture) is layered and complex, the rise of technology and social media has ushered in an era of accessible activism that pushes against this history. Native peoples across the world now have practicable, highly visible modes to express unique voices that challenge and redefine how Natives are represented both internal and external of their communities. "Perspectives on Native Representations" seeks to highlight the multiple contexts through which representations of Native communities, culture and individuals are being shifted and reimagined.

Annual Symposium on Contemporary Native American Issues, Feb 20

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
While the history between Native peoples and representations of identity projected upon them (having been replicated and reinforced in popular culture) is layered and complex, the rise of technology and social media has ushered in an era of accessible activism that pushes against this history. Native peoples across the world now have practicable, highly visible modes to express unique voices that challenge and redefine how Natives are represented both internal and external of their communities. Perspectives on Native Representations seeks to highlight the multiple contexts through which representations of Native communities, culture and individuals are being shifted and re-imagined.

The symposium features keynotes and presentations from scholars around the nation.

A Tale of Two Rockshelters, Feb 25

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
Until recently, the Mangareva (Gambier) Islands of French Polynesia have remained among the least studied in Eastern Polynesia from an archaeological perspective. Since 2001, Prof. Kirch has directed five seasons of fieldwork in Mangareva, resulting in the definition of a prehistoric cultural sequence extending back to ca. A.D. 950 and initial Polynesian colonization. Faunal and floral assemblages recovered from two well stratified rockshelters on Agakauitai and Kamaka Islands reveal dramatic changes in the islands' ecology during the period of Polynesian occupation, including the extirpation of large seabird populations, the introduction of invasive rats, and deforestation.

Brown Bag Lecture, Mar 25

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:25
This is a brown bag lecture