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Brown Bag Lecture, Nov 4

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:11
This is part of a series of brown bag lectures.

"Immerse yourself in the Past": Baths (hammamat) in Time and Space, Nov 5

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:11
Baths and communal bathing once constituted a common spatial form and cultural practice that spanned the Middle East and Mediterranean from ancient times to the early 20th century. The recent revival of the baths (hammamat) in these regions is embedded in neo-liberal notions of the body and new forms of consumption and leisure. While the meaning and usage of the baths has been profoundly transformed, continuity with the past is evident architecturally, spatially, and in the sequencing of activities. Moreover, they are once again sites for leisure, life-cycle celebrations, and the performance of bodily rituals - sacred, profane, and medicinal. As the baths have been repurposed for a novel set of consumers and to new ends, they have been endowed with new and markedly different meanings. Although imbued with nostalgia for an imagined Arab-Islamic, as well as an Ottoman past previously conceptualized in rather negative terms, they now operate under market principles and are geared to tourists and young local consumers.

Heritage and Ancestors: The Politics of Chinese Museums and Historical Memory, Nov 6

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:11
The current Chinese boom in museum-building and in the construction of memorial sites coincides with a broad re-definition of the official and predominant view of China’s history and identity. The Mao-era Communist orthodoxy of history as a sequence of class struggles is replaced across the board, with a story of unbroken, if interrupted, national glory. In this presentation I ask, how are the current developments related to older Chinese conceptions of culture-hero ancestry and imperial glory? Moreover, in what ways should we understand the new Chinese developments within their broader context — especially the simultaneous, yet seemingly paradoxical current world trends of economic globalization and narrow nationalism?

Elvera Kwang Siam Lim Memorial Lecture

AIA Lecture - Transportation and Regional Exchange in the Ancient Andes, Nov 17

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:11
The Inca road system that much impressed 16th century Spanish explorers is thought to have extended over nearly 25,000 miles, and yet the Inca empire existed for less than 100 years. How did the empire grow so quickly from Cusco Peru to cover much of western South America and develop such a tremendous road network in their mountainous lands? The answer lies in studying the polities that preceded the Inca and the trade networks that had emerged over millennia that moved items between ecological zones and linked communities across distances. One type of evidence for the development of these ties between distant regions comes from studying artifacts like obsidian that can be sourced using geochemistry, and the links between obsidian source areas and sites where obsidian has been recovered by archaeologists.

This talk will describe my work in Peru, Bolivia, and Chile examining obsidian quarries in the high Andes and patterns in the distribution of archaeological obsidian over time that has been organized in a geographical information system (GIS). These patterns are considered in light of observations gathered during a two-week ethnoarchaeological study in 2007 with a llama caravan bearing salt on a 200 km journey to neighboring valley in southern Peru. The regular circuits traveled by llama caravans over thousands of years transported portable goods but these traders also moved information and maintained social ties, which enabled the forging of cultural traditions over a broad region long before the Inca.

Brown Bag Lecture, Nov 18

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:11
This is part of a series of brown bag lectures.

The Melpomene Chair Greek Studies Conference, Dec 7

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:11
A conference of invited papers on the language, literature, culture, and reception of Ancient Greece.
The conference marks the retirement in December 2015 of Donald Mastronarde, Melpomene Distinguished Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures, and the speakers are Berkeley PhD's and Scuola Normale (Pisa) PhD's from past decades and recent years.

PopUp Exhibition | Greg Niemeyer on The Materials of Memory, Dec 9

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:11
Greg Niemeyer is Associate Professor in the Center for New Media at Berkeley. He was born in Switzerland in 1967 and studied photography and classics. He received his MFA at Stanford in 1992, and founded Stanford’s Digital Art Center. At the Berkeley Center for New Media, Professor Niemeyer focuses on “the mediation between humans as individuals and humans as a collective through technological means, and emphasizes playful responses to technology”. His presentation will focus on the materials from which the Hanukkah lamps owned by the Magnes are made, paying particular attention to a lamp built in 1946, shortly after the Holocaust.

AIA Lecture - A Way to Immortality. Greek Myths of Divinization and Etruscan Funerary Rituals, Jan 27

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:11
Greek mythology was the core of a religious, ideological and visual language shared by the peoples of the Mediterranean as part of the broader phenomenon of Hellenization. This phenomenon began earlier and developed in greater depth in Etruria than elsewhere; this involved an unprecedented reception of Greek myth, which prefigured a similar phenomenon that occurred later in the Roman culture.
In actuality, Etruscan selection and representation of particular Greek myths shed light on their own concept of religion and demand for self-identity. From this perspective, any discrepancy and inconsistency in the shared mythological language is particularly relevant, and can be compared with known differences between Etruscan and Greek ritual behavior. This approach provides the key to deciphering the peculiarities of the selection and adaption of Greek myth in Etruria, where figural monuments often represent mythological scenes that do not correspond to the narratives preserved for us in Classical literary sources.
Our knowledge of Etruscan civilization derives in large part from tomb contexts, thus providing a somewhat funerary-biased image of this people. Still, it is clear that funerary religion played an important role in Etruscan ideology, with special regard to their beliefs and expectations in afterlife.
From a few passages found in Roman sources, we know that Etruscan lore knew a ritual destined to make the soul of the deceased immortal and divine by means of special, recurring sacrifices. The dead arising to the rank of (minor) deities were then called di animales, “animal gods” (or, better, “gods (deriving) from souls”).
The existence of such a ritual could then encourage the proliferation of myths that concerned the divinization of human beings; in turn, this provides an explanation for the preference of such myths on the side of the Etruscans. This is the case, for instance, with Hercules, very often represented as ascending to Olympus or presented to the gods in an apotheosis; this could work as well for Leucothea, Ariadne, Tithonus, and so on. These heroic and divine figures were all much more frequently represented in Etruria than in Greece, the Etruscan often selecting rare variants of a myth that would show the performance of a sacred ritual (such as, for instance, a libation offered by Hercules, or the liquid of immortality offered by Athena). Even Tydeus, the only Greek hero who was refused immortality because of his impiety (in the saga of the Seven Against Thebes), in Etruria acquired a popularity that was unparalleled in the Greek world.

The Melpomene Chair Greek Studies Conference, Dec 8

Other Archaeology Events at Cal - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:11
A conference of invited papers on the language, literature, culture, and reception of Ancient Greece.
The conference marks the retirement in December 2015 of Donald Mastronarde, Melpomene Distinguished Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures, and the speakers are Berkeley PhD's and Scuola Normale (Pisa) PhD's from past decades and recent years.

ARF Coordination Meeting, Sep 2

Upcoming ARF Events - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:10
The inaugural Wednesday meeting of the semester is a coordination meeting for ARF Faculty, Grad Students and Staff. There is no public lecture. The first lecture occurs on the second Wednesday (Sept 9).

Labor under the Sun and the Son, Sep 9

Upcoming ARF Events - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:10
How did the materiality of social relations inform strategies of resistance by coerced laborers in the Andean village of Pomacocha? Pomacocha was intensely affected by both Inka and Spanish colonialism. It began as a transplanted colony of agriculturalists to supply food for the nearby Inka palace and the Inka provincial capital of Vilcashuaman. After the Spanish conquest, the agricultural settlement at Pomacocha was abandoned. Later, a hacienda-obraje was established and a new native community sprang up around it. The area became a politically and economically important zone for the Spaniards. The main focus of this talk is the late colonial period (18th to early 19th centuries), a time of general upheaval in the Andes. However, in order to understand and contextualize the impact of Spanish colonialism in Pomacocha, I analyze the long-term evolution of strategies of control and resistance, starting with the Inka period. Pomacocha is an ideal case study to compare Inka and Spanish colonialism, because imperial political and economic policies penetrated deeply into Pomacocha under both regimes. Pomacocha provides rare insight into the lives of the people whose labor sustained the colonial regimes.

Brown Bag Lecture, Sep 16

Upcoming ARF Events - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:10
This is part of the brown bag series of lectures.

Brown Bag Lecture, Sep 23

Upcoming ARF Events - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:10
This is part of a brown bag series of lectures.

Brown Bag Lecture, Sep 30

Upcoming ARF Events - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:10
This is part of the brown bag series of lectures.

Brown Bag Lecture, Oct 7

Upcoming ARF Events - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:10
This is part of a series of brown bag lectures.

Brown Bag Lecture, Oct 14

Upcoming ARF Events - Fri, 08/28/2015 - 10:10
This is part of a series of brown bag lectures.
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