Tech: trunk.ly

I’m putting together a collection of links for an experiment tomorrow. I’ll see what the reaction is before I do it again. If ma.gnolia were still active then it would be easy to post, but adding the links by hand is a bit more of a chore. A tool that is making it a bit easier though is trunk.ly

Trunk.ly looks at your Twitter feed and sees what links you’re posting or re-tweeting. It also looks for links in tweets that you mark as a favourite. It then follows the links to see what the page is and stores the links for you. If you’ve hash-tagged the tweet then that hashtag becomes a tag in trunk.ly.

Trunk.ly in action
Trunk.ly in action

You can also add links from Facebook accounts, del.icio.us account and RSS feeds. This might be a slight concern for some people. In my case Twitter and del.icio.us are public and Facebook I largely keep private. Not only can you see your own links, but it’s possible to follow other people’s trunk.ly accounts and for other people to follow you. So if you’re adding links from private accounts into trunk.ly, you might want to make your trunk.ly account private too.

The reason I’m using trunk.ly is that it follows the places where I’m most likely to leave links at the moment. It’s also forgettable – and that’s a good thing. I could store links in del.icio.us or send links to a twitter account to keep track of them, but this often takes an effort. Whatever it is that I do end up doing there’s a good chance I’m tracking it with trunk.ly and I don’t consciously have to remember to update that account too to keep up to date with my links. I don’t know how easy it will be to search as the number of links grow, but for now it’s doing the job of tracking what I’m looking at well and it makes it much easier to scoot back and pull the links out for posts like tomorrow’s.